Apr 172017
 

Peter Shire Exhibition At MOCA

THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, LOS ANGELES (MOCA), PRESENTS

PETER SHIRE: NAKED IS THE BEST DISGUISE

April 22–July 2, 2017
MOCA Pacific Design Center

The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), presents Peter Shire: Naked Is the Best Disguise, a survey of Los Angeles–based artist Peter Shire’s work in design from the 1970s to today. For more than four decades, Shire has positioned himself at the intersection of craft, industrial design, and fine art. A key figure in Southern California’s postwar “post-pottery” ceramics movement, he rose to prominence as the only American founding member of Memphis, the Milan-based design collective, and has since experimented with metal, glass, painting, and large-scale outdoor public art. Shire is perhaps best known for the brightly colored splatter-painted mugs and handcrafted earthenware he has produced under the name Echo Park Pottery since 1972.

Shire’s first design survey in a Los Angeles museum, Peter Shire: Naked Is the Best Disguise includes ceramics and some of Shire’s most recognized furniture pieces, such as his celebrated Bel Air Chair of 1981, produced by Memphis. Memphis designs, produced and exhibited in annual collections from 1981 to 1988, challenged the protocols of good taste and the modernist dictum “form follows function,” and Shire’s furniture from that period and beyond provocatively embraces humor and whimsy in its exaggerated proportions, wild color combinations, nonsensical shapes, asymmetrical compositions, and lowly materials. Shire’s signature aesthetic comes from an irreverent cross-pollination of references, from midcentury modernist architecture to California surfing and hot rod culture, Bauhaus and Constructivist designs, and the vibrant color palette of the Echo Park neighborhood where he was born and continues to live. The artist’s furniture—tables, lamps, and chairs—will be displayed alongside a selection of his works on paper, ranging from fantastical sketches to engineering plans, which provide insight into his design process.

The exhibition premieres a third iteration of Shire’s Bel Air Chair (1981), specially commissioned by MOCA. This 2017 chair will be exhibited alongside the original 1981 version and a later 2010 version (Belle Aire Chair). This new iteration, titled Brentwood Chair, sees Shire returning to the fundamental building blocks of cubes, cylinders, cones, and spheres, and bold primary colors. Walking the razor’s edge between function and functionlessness, practical use and pure aesthetics, and furniture and sculpture, Brentwood Chair cleverly toys with the hierarchy of the applied and fine arts.

The exhibition includes more than twenty examples of the artist’s touchstone form, the teapot. Since the early 1970s, Shire has returned time and again to producing ceramic teapots which he characterizes as “referentially functional.” Arranged in teetering, vertiginous compositions and outfitted with outlandish appendages, Shire’s teapots—with their absurd proportions, improbable angles, and exuberant colors—stretch and squeeze the requirements of utility. Through clay, his most tried-and-true medium, Shire has sustained a decades-long manipulation of the categories of art and craft. While he brings ceramics to the brink of sculpture, Shire remains committed to ceramics’ promise of egalitarianism and even political progressivism. Therein lies the significance of the teapot, a humble, domestically scaled object conceived for daily, shared use. Indeed, in occupying the roles of craftsperson, designer, and artist, Shire insists that everyday experience is worthy of aesthetic consideration.

Peter Shire: Naked Is the Best Disguise is Shire’s second solo show at MOCA. In 1985, Peter Shire: Olympic Village/UCLA Entertainment Center with Animals reinstalled Shire’s environmental architectural structures, originally commissioned for the 1984 Olympic Village, on the plaza in front of The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA (then The Temporary Contemporary).

Peter Shire (b. 1947, Los Angeles) lives and works in the Echo Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. He received his BFA from Chouinard Art Institute in 1970. Shire’s work is in a number of public collections including The Art Institute of Chicago; The Brooklyn Museum of Art; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; The Los Angeles County Museum of Art; The Seattle Museum of Art; and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. In 2016 he mounted solo exhibitions at Derek Ellery Gallery, New York; The Jewish Museum, New York; Les Gens Heureux, Copenhagen; New Galerie, Paris; and Peres Projects, Berlin. He has recently been featured in exhibitions at A + D Museum, Los Angeles; David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles; Instituto Italiano di Cultura, Los Angeles; LSU Museum of Art, Baton Rouge; Office Baroque, Brussels; and Venus Over Los Angeles.

Peter Shire: Naked Is the Best Disguise is organized by Anna Katz, Wendy Stark Curatorial Fellow, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

Lead support for MOCA Pacific Design Center is provided by Charles S. Cohen.

Exhibitions at MOCA are supported by the MOCA Fund for Exhibitions with lead annual support provided by Delta Air Lines and Sydney Holland, founder of the Sydney D. Holland Foundation. Generous funding is also provided by Allison and Larry Berg, and Jerri and Dr. Steven Nagelberg.

Image credit: Peter Shire, Bel Air Chair, 1981, 48 ½ x 43 x 48 ½ in. (123.19 × 109.22 × 123.19 cm), wood, steel, enamel, and upholstery fabric, courtesy of the artist, photo by Joshua White

RELATED PROGRAMS

MEMBERS’ OPENING: PETER SHIRE: NAKED IS THE BEST DISGUISE
Friday, April 21
MOCA Pacific Design Center
INFO 213/621-1794 or membership@moca.org
FREE for MOCA members; no reservations necessary

PETER SHIRE AND ANNA KATZ IN CONVERSATION
Sunday, June 25, 3pm
West Hollywood Council Chambers
625 North San Vicente Blvd.
West Hollywood, CA 90069
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE for MOCA members; no reservations necessary

Please check moca.org for updates on related programs.

THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, LOS ANGELES (MOCA)
About MOCA: Founded in 1979, MOCA’s vision is to be the defining museum of contemporary art. In a relatively short period of time, MOCA has achieved astonishing growth with three Los Angeles locations of architectural renown; a world-class permanent collection of more than 6,800 objects, international in scope and among the finest in the world; hallmark education programs that are widely emulated; award-winning publications that present original scholarship; groundbreaking monographic, touring, and thematic exhibitions of international repute that survey the art of our time; and cutting-edge engagement with modes of new media production. MOCA is a not-for-profit institution that relies on a variety of funding sources for its activities.

Hours: MOCA Grand Avenue (located at 250 South Grand Avenue in Downtown Los Angeles) is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 11am to 6pm; Thursday from 11am to 8pm; Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 5pm; and closed on Tuesday. The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA (located at 152 North Central Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90012) has the same hours as MOCA Grand Avenue during exhibitions. Please call ahead or go to moca.org for the exhibition schedule for The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA.

MOCA Pacific Design Center (located at 8687 Melrose Avenue, West Hollywood, CA 90069) is open Tuesday through Friday from 11am to 5pm; Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 6pm; and closed on Monday.

The MOCA Store at MOCA Grand Avenue (located at 250 South Grand Avenue) is open Monday through Wednesday and Friday from 10:30am to 5:30pm; Thursday from 10:30am to 8:30pm; and Saturday and Sunday from 10:30am to 6:30pm.

Museum Admission: General admission is free for all MOCA members. General admission is also free for everyone at MOCA Grand Avenue and The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA on Thursdays from 5pm to 8pm, courtesy of Wells Fargo. General admission is always free at MOCA Pacific Design Center.

General admission at MOCA Grand Avenue and The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA is $15 for adults; $8 for students with I.D.; $10 for seniors (65+); and free for children under 12 and jurors with I.D.

More Information: For 24-hour information on current exhibitions, education programs, and special events, call 213/626-6222 or access MOCA online at moca.org.

 

Comment?

Name
Email
Comment Title
Rating
Comment Content

 

 

Mar 142017
 

THE GEFFEN CONTEMPORARY AT MOCA
SPRING 2017 EXHIBITION SCHEDULE

CARL ANDRE: SCULPTURE AS PLACE, 1958–2010

April 2–July 24, 2017

ARTHUR JAFA: LOVE IS THE MESSAGE, THE MESSAGE IS DEATH

SELECTIONS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION: CATHERINE OPIE AND STERLING RUBY

April 2–June 12, 2017

Arthur Jafa
CARL ANDRE: SCULPTURE AS PLACE, 1958–2010
April 2–July 24, 2017
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
Exhibition Curators: Philippe Vergne and Yasmil Raymond
MOCA Curator: Bennett Simpson

The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), presents Carl Andre: Sculpture as Place, 1958–2010, an exhibition tracing the full evolution of the work of Carl Andre, a crucial figure in the redefinition of contemporary sculpture. The retrospective, which premiered at Dia:Beacon in 2014, includes sculptures; poems and works on paper; a selection of rarely exhibited assemblages; and an unprecedented selection of photographs and ephemera. This is the first museum survey of Andre’s entire five-decade oeuvre and his first retrospective in North America since 1978–80.

The exhibition represents all major historical and aesthetic shifts in Andre’s career, from his early exercises to his most recent work. The main stages of Andre’s mature oeuvre are represented by a large selection of sculptures including the artist’s defining floor sculptures, modular arrangements of unaltered building and industrial materials such as brick stacks, metal squares, slabs, and timber blocks. An unprecedented display of poems and typewriter works examine the pivotal role of language in Andre’s practice, providing a strikingly intimate perspective on his visionary approach to concrete poetry. The exhibition also offers a rare opportunity to view a selection of Andre’s Dada Forgeries—a legendary series of assemblages and readymade-like pieces produced sporadically between the late 1950s and the early 2000s—as well as ephemera and photographic documentation.

The retrospective was co-curated by MOCA Director Philippe Vergne and Yasmil Raymond, Associate Curator at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in close collaboration with the artist. The presentation at MOCA follows an extensive European tour including Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid; Hamburger Bahnhof, Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin; and Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris. A comprehensive catalog accompanies the exhibition.

Carl Andre: Sculpture as Place, 1958-2010 is organized by Dia Art Foundation, and co-curated by Philippe Vergne and Yasmil Raymond.

The international tour of Carl Andre: Sculpture as Place, 1958-2010 is made possible by lead support from the Henry Luce Foundation and the Terra Foundation for American Art. Additional tour support is provided by the Fundación Almine y Bernard Ruiz-Picasso para el Arte; The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston; the National Endowment for the Arts; and Sotheby’s.

The Los Angeles presentation is organized by Bennett Simpson, Senior Curator, with Anna Katz, Wendy Stark Curatorial Fellow, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

MOCA’s Lead support is provided by the Aileen Getty Foundation, and the Lenore S. and Bernard A. Greenberg Fund.

Generous support is provided by The Mohn Family Foundation.

Additional support is provided by Wonmi and Kihong Kwon, and Joseph Varet and Esther Kim Varet.

Exhibitions at MOCA are supported by the MOCA Fund for Exhibitions with lead annual support provided by Delta Air Lines, Shari Glazer, and Sydney Holland, founder of the Sydney D. Holland Foundation. Generous funding is also provided by Allison and Larry Berg, and Jerri and Dr. Steven Nagelberg.

Image credit: Installation view, Carl Andre: Sculpture as Place, 1958–2010, Dia:Beacon, Riggio Galleries, Beacon, New York, © Carl Andre/Licensed by VAGA, New York, photo by Bill Jacobson Studio, New York, courtesy Dia Art Foundation, New York

RELATED PROGRAMS

MEMBERS’ OPENING: CARL ANDRE: SCULPTURE AS PLACE, 1958–2010
Saturday, April 1
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
INFO 213/621-1794 or membership@moca.org
FREE for MOCA members; no reservations necessary

LECTURE: CHARLES BERNSTEIN
Sunday, April 30, 3pm
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE with museum admission; priority entry for MOCA members

LECTURE: BENNETT SIMPSON
Thursday, May 4, 7pm
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE

LECTURE: ANNA CHAVE
Thursday, July 6, 7pm
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE

Please check moca.org for updates on related programs.

Carl Andre
ARTHUR JAFA: LOVE IS THE MESSAGE, THE MESSAGE IS DEATH
April 2–June 12, 2017
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
Curator: Helen Molesworth

Love Is The Message, The Message Is Death is a new video by artist, director, and award-winning cinematographer Arthur Jafa. Set to the searing highs and lows of Kanye West’s gospel-inspired hip-hop track “Ultralight Beam,” Love Is The Message is a masterful convergence of found footage tracing African American identity through a spectrum of contemporary imagery that includes photographs of civil-rights leaders watermarked “Getty Images,” helicopter views of the L.A. Riots, and a wave of bodies dancing the Dougie. The meticulously edited seven-minute video suspends viewers in a swelling, emotional montage that is a testament to Jafa’s profound ability to mine, scrutinize, and reclaim media’s representational modes and strategies. Alongside images of familiar Black icons and historic events are also scenes of lesser-known figures, anonymous bodies in various states of elation and despair. Excerpts from Jafa’s own documentary film Dreams Are Colder Than Death (2014) add a personal dimension to a work otherwise drawn from news media, television, and the Internet. While Love Is The Message poignantly embodies the artist’s desire to create a cinema that “replicates the power, beauty and alienation of Black Music,” it also reminds us that the collective multitude defining Blackness comprises singular individuals with manifold identities and unaccountable differences.

Arthur Jafa: Love Is The Message, The Message Is Death is organized by Helen Molesworth, Chief Curator, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

Exhibitions at MOCA are supported by the MOCA Fund for Exhibitions with lead annual support provided by Delta Air Lines, Shari Glazer, and Sydney Holland, founder of the Sydney D. Holland Foundation. Generous funding is also provided by Allison and Larry Berg.

Image credit: Arthur Jafa, Love Is The Message, The Message Is Death (still), 2016, single-channel video (color, sound), 7:30 minutes, courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York/Rome

RELATED PROGRAMS

ARTHUR JAFA AND HELEN MOLESWORTH IN CONVERSATION
Sunday, April 2, 1pm
Tateuchi Democracy Forum at the National Center for the Preservation of Democracy (NCPD)
111 North Central Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90012
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE with museum admission; priority entry for MOCA members

LOS ANGELES FILMFORUM AT MOCA PRESENTS
ARTHUR JAFA’S DREAMS ARE COLDER THAN DEATH
Thursday, May 11, 7pm
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
INFO 213/621-1745 or education@moca.org
FREE for MOCA and Los Angeles Filmforum members
$15 general admission, $8 students with valid ID

Please check moca.org for updates on related programs.

Soft Work
SELECTIONS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION: CATHERINE OPIE AND STERLING RUBY
April 2–June 12, 2017
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
Curator: Bennett Simpson

MOCA presents two recent acquisitions to the museum’s permanent collection: SOFT WORK (2011–13) by Sterling Ruby and Inauguration Portfolio (2009) by Catherine Opie. Shown in the United States for the first time, Ruby’s SOFT WORK is a large-scale installation of stuffed fabric sculptures in unsettling biomorphic forms. Appendaged cushions and gaping, fang-filled mouths are manically arranged as sausage link–like drips from the ceiling, coiled heaps across the floor, and slumping, abject forms throughout the space. Using textiles that evoke the colors and motifs of the American flag, the sprawling installation offers up that iconic symbol of national pride as an intensely visceral experience—a political scene filled with performative “bodies” that seem to manifest both theater and playground simultaneously. Opie’s 33-photograph Inauguration Portfolio, a collective portrait of the over one million Americans who gathered on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., to partake in the inauguration of President Barack Obama, provides a compelling documentary counterpoint to SOFT WORK. Opie focuses her lens not on the swearing-in ceremony itself or other such singular historical moments but instead on more elusive or anti-climactic subject matter—the anonymous figures bundled up in 20-degree weather, the Jumbotron screen broadcasting the ceremony, and the detritus left behind after the crowd has dispersed. Opie’s poignant photographs suggest that the election is significant not only for the person at its center but for the millions of Americans whom the commander-in-chief is called upon to represent through the democratic process.

Selections from the Permanent Collection: Catherine Opie and Sterling Ruby is organized by Bennett Simpson, Senior Curator, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

Image credit: Sterling Ruby, installation view of SOFT WORK (2011-13), Art Basel: Unlimited, Switzerland, 2014, photography by Timo Ohler, courtesy of Sprüth Magers

 

Comment?

Name
Email
Comment Title
Rating
Comment Content

 

 

Feb 282017
 
Weed Killer

Image credit: Patrick Staff, Weed Killer, 2017, video still, courtesy of the artist

MOCA GRAND AVENUE
SPRING 2017 EXHIBITION SCHEDULE
KERRY JAMES MARSHALL: MASTRY
PATRICK STAFF: WEED KILLER

March 12–July 3, 2017
MOCA Grand Avenue

 

KERRY JAMES MARSHALL: MASTRY

March 12–July 3, 2017
MOCA Grand Avenue
Curator: Helen Molesworth

The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), will present a 35-year retrospective of work by painter Kerry James Marshall. From his seminal Portrait of the Artist as a Shadow of His Former Self (1980) to his most recent explorations of African American history, Marshall’s first major retrospective in the United States contains nearly 80 paintings—all of which depict Black subjects, presented with utter equality and humanity, going about their daily business. The exhibition is co-organized by MOCA, the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, and The Metropolitan Museum of Art under the leadership of MOCA Chief Curator Helen Molesworth.

Club Couple

Image credit: Kerry James Marshall, Untitled (Club Couple), 2014, acrylic on PVC panel, 59 5/8 x 59 5/8 in. (149.5 x 149.5 cm), The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, promised gift of Mandy and Cliff Einstein.

The exhibition unfolds in chronological order, charting our nation’s evolving ideas and attitudes towards race and its role in the history of the United States. Beginning with Marshall’s exploration of Ralph Ellison’s classic novel Invisible Man, which explores the lack of African Americans in the culture at large, the exhibition continues on to a suite of paintings dedicated to the exploration of Black love and portraits of members of the Cato’s Rebellion; it culminates in paintings made during the Obama presidency, including a stunning set of portraits of Black artists at work in their studios.

A deeply accomplished painter of ravishing works, Marshall has a threefold strategy. First, he decided as a young artist to paint only Black subjects, and he continues to do so in an unapologetic ebony black that occupies the paintings with a sense of authority and belonging. Second, Marshall works to make a wide variety of images featuring Black subjects—exquisite portraits, lush landscapes, everyday domestic interiors, and depictions of historical events­—infiltrating all of the major categories of Western painting in which they have historically been absent. Third, Marshall concentrates on painterly mastery as a fundamental strategy: by mastering the art of representational and figurative painting during a period when it wasn’t in vogue, Marshall is able to produce a body of work that bestows beauty and dignity where it has long been denied.

An accompanying catalogue chronicles Marshall’s career and includes sumptuous color plates of all of the works in the exhibition. The most comprehensive book on the artist to date, it collects all of Marshall’s published writings for the first time and presents them alongside contributions by Molesworth, MOCA Assistant Curator Lanka Tattersall, and others.

Kerry James Marshall (b. 1955, Birmingham, Alabama) grew up in Watts, Los Angeles, and is a 1978 graduate of the Otis College of Art and Design. After being an artist-in-residence at the Studio Museum in Harlem in 1986, he moved to Chicago, where he continues to live and work today. Marshall is the recipient of several awards, grants, and fellowships including the MacArthur genius grant in 1997 and an honorary doctorate from Otis College of Art and Design in 1999. In 2013 he was named to President Obama’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities. Marshall has exhibited widely, both nationally and internationally. Kerry James Marshall: In the Tower was most recently on view at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. (2013). Other recent solo exhibitions include Kerry James Marshall: Painting and Other Stuff, organized by the Museum van Hedendaagse Kunst Antwerpen, Antwerp, Belgium, traveling to the Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Denmark; the Antoni Tapies Foundation, Barcelona; and the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid (2014); and exhibitions at Secession, Vienna (2012); the Wexner Center for the Arts (2008); Camden Arts Centre (2005); MCA Chicago (2003); and the Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago (1998).

Marshall has completed murals and public projects in Chicago, New York, and Philadelphia, and has work in dozens of public collections including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Birmingham Museum of Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Art Institute of Chicago; Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Kerry James Marshall: Mastry is organized by The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

The exhibition was co-curated by Helen Molesworth, Chief Curator, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Dieter Roelstraete, Guest Curator for the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; and Ian Alteveer, Associate Curator, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Lead support is provided by Suzanne and David Johnson.

Major support is provided by Mandy and Cliff Einstein, Fox Television Group, and Lillian P. Lovelace.

Generous support is provided by Maria Seferian, Jack Shainman Gallery, Tom and Janet Unterman, and David Zwirner Gallery.

Additional support is provided by Carolyn Powers, Blake Byrne, James W. Kenyon, Rennie Foundation, Nancy Adams-Sims and Charles Sims, Mara Brock Akil, Janine and Lyndon Barrois, Joshua Friedman, Kwanza Jones and José Feliciano SUPERCHARGED Foundation, Dee Kerrison and Gianna Drake-Kerrison, Koplin Del Rio Gallery, Arthur Lewis and Hau Nguyen, Thao Nguyen and Andreas Krainer, and V. Joy Simmons, MD.

Exhibitions at MOCA are supported by the MOCA Fund for Exhibitions, with lead annual support provided by Delta Air Lines, Shari Glazer, Hästens, and Sydney Holland, founder of the Sydney D. Holland Foundation. Generous funding is also provided by Allison and Larry Berg, and Jerri and Dr. Steven Nagelberg.

In-kind media support is provided by KCETLink, KCRW 89.9 FM, and Los Angeles magazine.

RELATED PROGRAMS

MEMBERS’ OPENING: KERRY JAMES MARSHALL: MASTRY
Saturday, March 11
MOCA Grand Avenue
INFO 213/621-1794 or membership@moca.org
FREE for MOCA members; no reservations necessary

ARTISTS ON ARTISTS: LARI PITTMAN ON KERRY JAMES MARSHALL
Thursday, March 23, 7pm
MOCA Grand Avenue
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE

SUNDAY STUDIO
Sunday, March 26, 1–4pm
MOCA Grand Avenue
INFO 213/621-1745 or education@moca.org
FREE

KERRY JAMES MARSHALL AND HELEN MOLESWORTH IN CONVERSATION
Thursday, March 30, 7pm
Colburn School, Zipper Hall
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE; priority entry for MOCA members

READING: HARRYETTE MULLEN
Sunday, April 9, 3pm
MOCA Grand Avenue
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE with museum admission

LECTURE: HELEN MOLESWORTH
Thursday, April 20, 7pm
MOCA Grand Avenue
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE

READING: ROBIN COSTE LEWIS
Sunday, May 7, 3pm
MOCA Grand Avenue
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE with museum admission

LECTURE: GREG TATE
Thursday, May 18, 7pm
MOCA Grand Avenue, Ahmanson Auditorium
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE; priority entry for MOCA members

READING: WILL ALEXANDER
Sunday, June 4, 3pm
MOCA Grand Avenue
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE with museum admission

ARTISTS ON ARTISTS: DEANA LAWSON
Thursday, June 29, 7pm
MOCA Grand Avenue
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE

Please check moca.org for updates on related programs.

PATRICK STAFF: WEED KILLER

March 12–July 3, 2017
MOCA Grand Avenue
Curator: Lanka Tattersall

The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), presents Patrick Staff: Weed Killer, the premiere of a newly commissioned work by UK and Los Angeles–based artist Patrick Staff. Staff’s starting point is artist and writer Catherine Lord’s memoir, The Summer of Her Baldness (2004), a moving and irreverent account of the author’s diagnosis, treatment, and transformation through her experience of cancer. At the heart of Staff’s installation is a video featuring a monologue, adapted from Lord’s book, in which an actress likens the devastating effects of chemotherapy drugs to “mainlining weed killer.” Presented as an immersive environment, Weed Killer draws into focus the fine line between poisonous and curative substances.

The work’s central monologue is intercut with otherworldly sequences of choreographed gestures (performed primarily by Staff) shot with high-definition thermal imagery and a passionately lip-synced rendition of a love song by a performer in a gay bar. The actions in these scenes position desire as an intoxicating illness in which internal states and external appearances are blurred. The thermal scenes draw attention to the ways our ostensibly uniform bodies are actually composed of various zones of heat and coolness, suggesting a visual analog for the complexity of identity. With skin temperatures registered in a radiant spectrum of colors, the bodies look simultaneously unsettling and mesmerizing, erotic and infected. At one point in the thermal footage, Staff is accompanied by a revolving cement mixer, which stands in as a prosthetic body, in a duet between human and machine, or the organic and the constructed.

All the performers in Weed Killer identify as transgender. By probing both trans experiences and a narrative about cancer, Staff points to conditions that are similarly marked by the treatment, regulation, and transformation of the body through pharmacological means, from chemotherapy and antidepressant drugs to hormone therapies. Weed Killer suggests a complex relationship to one’s own suffering and community, evoking the ways in which the impact and movement of illness extend beyond the visible.

Patrick Staff (b. 1987, Bognor Regis, UK; lives in Los Angeles and London) is an interdisciplinary artist who works with film, installation, dance, and performance to investigate dissent, labor, and the queer body. Recent solo exhibitions have taken place at Chisenhale Gallery, London, UK; Spike Island, Bristol, UK; Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia; and Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, Canada. Patrick Staff: Weed Killer is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in the United States.

Patrick Staff: Weed Killer is organized by Lanka Tattersall, Assistant Curator, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

Exhibitions at MOCA are supported by the MOCA Fund for Exhibitions with lead annual support provided by Delta Air Lines, Shari Glazer, and Sydney Holland, founder of the Sydney D. Holland Foundation. Generous funding is also provided by Allison and Larry Berg, and Jerri and Dr. Steven Nagelberg.

In-kind support is provided by FLIR Systems.

RELATED PROGRAMS

MEMBERS’ OPENING: PATRICK STAFF: WEED KILLER
Saturday, March 11
MOCA Grand Avenue
INFO 213/621-1794 or membership@moca.org
FREE for MOCA members; no reservations necessary

CATHERINE LORD, PATRICK STAFF, AND LANKA TATTERSALL IN CONVERSATION
Sunday, March 19, 3pm
MOCA Grand Avenue, Ahmanson Auditorium
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE with museum admission; priority entry for MOCA members

EXHIBITION WALKTHROUGH: LANKA TATTERSALL
Thursday, June 8, 6pm
MOCA Grand Avenue
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE

LECTURE: S. LØCHLANN JAIN
Thursday, June 8, 7pm
MOCA Grand Avenue, Ahmanson Auditorium
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE; priority entry for MOCA members

 

Comment?

Name
Email
Comment Title
Rating
Comment Content