Jan 172018
 

Winter And Spring 2018 At MOCA

 

MOCA’S WINTER AND SPRING 2018 EXHIBITION SCHEDULE

 

REAL WORLDS: BRASSAÏ, ARBUS, GOLDIN

March 4–September 3, 2018
MOCA Grand Avenue

LAUREN HALSEY: WE STILL HERE, THERE

March 4–September 3, 2018
MOCA Grand Avenue

JACKSON POLLOCK’S NUMBER 1, 1949: A CONSERVATION TREATMENT

March 4–September 3, 2018
MOCA Grand Avenue

WELCOME TO THE DOLLHOUSE

January 20–April 8, 2018
MOCA Pacific Design Center

 

REAL WORLDS: BRASSAÏ, ARBUS, GOLDIN

 

REAL WORLDS: BRASSAÏ, ARBUS, GOLDIN

March 4–September 3, 2018
MOCA Grand Avenue
Curator: Lanka Tattersall

The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), presents Real Worlds: Brassaï, Arbus, Goldin, an exhibition that brings together the works of three of the 20th century’s most influential photographers of modern life. Drawn largely from MOCA’s extraordinary collection of photography, the exhibition provides a remarkable opportunity to explore the ways in which Brassaï (Gyula Halász) (b. 1899, Brassó, Hungary (now Romania); d. 1984, Èze, France), Diane Arbus (b.1923, New York; d. 1971, New York) and Nan Goldin (b. 1953, Washington, D.C.) use the camera to reflect and transform the world around them. Real Worlds features an exceptional trove of approximately one hundred works by the three artists, including Brassaï’s unforgettable images of the nocturnal denizens of Paris, Arbus’s most memorable and unsettling portraits, and Goldin’s searingly poignant documentation of herself and her community. The exhibition is structured around MOCA’s nearly comprehensive collection of photographs that appear in three legendary photobooks: Brassaï’s The Secret Paris of the 30’s (1976), the posthumous Diane Arbus: An Aperture Monograph (1972), and Goldin’s The Ballad of Sexual Dependency (1986).

Image credit: Nan Goldin, Picnic on the Esplanade, Boston, 1973, cibachrome print, 11 x 14 in. (27.9 x 35.6 cm), courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, The Nimoy Family Foundation

LAUREN HALSEY: WE STILL HERE, THERE

 

LAUREN HALSEY: WE STILL HERE, THERE

March 4–September 3, 2018
MOCA Grand Avenue
Curator: Lanka Tattersall

The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), presents Lauren Halsey: we still here, there, a site-specific installation work created at MOCA’s Grand Avenue location. This spring Los Angeles–based artist Lauren Halsey (b. 1987, Los Angeles, California) will take up residence at MOCA Grand Avenue, where she will build and regularly change an immersive space resembling a fantastical system of caves that viewers are invited to linger in and explore. This environment will serve as a visionary archive reflecting the diversity of everyday Black cultural experiences in South Central L.A., the artist’s home since childhood.

Image credit: Lauren Halsey, detail, Kingdom Splurge (2.4.6.14), 2014, mixed media, 288 x 480 in., Yale University, New Haven

JACKSON POLLOCK’S NUMBER 1, 1949: A CONSERVATION TREATMENT

 

JACKSON POLLOCK’S NUMBER 1, 1949: A CONSERVATION TREATMENT

March 4–September 3, 2018
MOCA Grand Avenue
Organized by The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, in collaboration with The Getty Conservation Institute.

This spring The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), will conduct a thorough conservation of Jackson Pollock’s abstract expressionist painting Number 1, 1949 (1949), a treasure of MOCA’s collection since it was donated to the museum in 1989 by Rita Schreiber in loving memory of her husband, Taft Schreiber. Over the course of six months, the painting will undergo a significant conservation treatment, to be conducted publicly in MOCA’s Grand Avenue galleries. Working in collaboration with the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI), a paintings conservator will work on-site to clean the surface of the painting, revealing brighter whites, more brilliant metallics, and a cleaner canvas, ultimately allowing viewers to see the painting in a condition much closer to how it appeared originally. On select dates, the conservator will perform the conservation treatment during open hours, answering questions from the public about the protocols and processes of modern art conservation. Three works by Pollock from MOCA’s permanent collection, dating from 1943 to 1951, will also be on view, exemplifying a range of materials from watercolor to collage. Additionally, the exhibition will also include photographic and video documentation of Pollock’s iconic method of pouring paint from cans and flinging it from the tips of sticks and brushes onto unstretched canvasses on his studio floor.

Image credit: Jackson Pollock, Number 1, 1949, 1949, enamel and metallic paint on canvas, 63 x 102 1/2 in. (160.02 x 260.35 cm), The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, The Rita and Taft Schreiber Collection, Given in loving memory of her husband, Taft Schreiber, by Rita Schreiber

WELCOME TO THE DOLLHOUSE

 

WELCOME TO THE DOLLHOUSE

January 20–April 8, 2018
MOCA Pacific Design Center
Curator: Rebecca Matalon

The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), is pleased to announce Welcome to the Dollhouse, an exhibition of works from MOCA’s permanent collection that address, document, or deconstruct notions of domesticity. Moving through the everyday, if not ordinary, spaces one might find in a typical middle-class American suburban home—yard, foyer, kitchen, living room, bedroom, and bathroom—the exhibition playfully examines a variety of approaches to the idea of the domestic found within the museum’s renowned collection. Including sculpture, photography, painting, video, and drawing from the 1950s to the present, Welcome to the Dollhouse focuses on works by artists for whom a dissolution of the boundary between the fine arts and design is a central concern; works by artists engaged in a more documentary or photojournalistic approach to capturing domestic spaces and their maintenance; works by artists that veer increasingly towards the melancholic and romantic in their depictions of the interior spaces of the home; and works by artists engaged in strategies of appropriation, often repurposing familiar household objects and/or their representations and making them increasingly strange or absurd. Some artists and works lie outside of these conceptual frameworks, while others could easily be said to move fluidly between and across them. What the works share, however, is the absence of the human form and the positioning of the viewer in the role of the inhabitant.

Image credit: Moyra Davey, Pilon, 1999, C-print, 14 x 18 in. (35.6 x 45.7 cm), The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, purchased with funds provided by the Photography Committee

 

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