Cultural Events In Los Angeles
Mar 142017
 

THE GEFFEN CONTEMPORARY AT MOCA
SPRING 2017 EXHIBITION SCHEDULE

CARL ANDRE: SCULPTURE AS PLACE, 1958–2010

April 2–July 24, 2017

ARTHUR JAFA: LOVE IS THE MESSAGE, THE MESSAGE IS DEATH

SELECTIONS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION: CATHERINE OPIE AND STERLING RUBY

April 2–June 12, 2017

Arthur Jafa
CARL ANDRE: SCULPTURE AS PLACE, 1958–2010
April 2–July 24, 2017
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
Exhibition Curators: Philippe Vergne and Yasmil Raymond
MOCA Curator: Bennett Simpson

The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), presents Carl Andre: Sculpture as Place, 1958–2010, an exhibition tracing the full evolution of the work of Carl Andre, a crucial figure in the redefinition of contemporary sculpture. The retrospective, which premiered at Dia:Beacon in 2014, includes sculptures; poems and works on paper; a selection of rarely exhibited assemblages; and an unprecedented selection of photographs and ephemera. This is the first museum survey of Andre’s entire five-decade oeuvre and his first retrospective in North America since 1978–80.

The exhibition represents all major historical and aesthetic shifts in Andre’s career, from his early exercises to his most recent work. The main stages of Andre’s mature oeuvre are represented by a large selection of sculptures including the artist’s defining floor sculptures, modular arrangements of unaltered building and industrial materials such as brick stacks, metal squares, slabs, and timber blocks. An unprecedented display of poems and typewriter works examine the pivotal role of language in Andre’s practice, providing a strikingly intimate perspective on his visionary approach to concrete poetry. The exhibition also offers a rare opportunity to view a selection of Andre’s Dada Forgeries—a legendary series of assemblages and readymade-like pieces produced sporadically between the late 1950s and the early 2000s—as well as ephemera and photographic documentation.

The retrospective was co-curated by MOCA Director Philippe Vergne and Yasmil Raymond, Associate Curator at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in close collaboration with the artist. The presentation at MOCA follows an extensive European tour including Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid; Hamburger Bahnhof, Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin; and Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris. A comprehensive catalog accompanies the exhibition.

Carl Andre: Sculpture as Place, 1958-2010 is organized by Dia Art Foundation, and co-curated by Philippe Vergne and Yasmil Raymond.

The international tour of Carl Andre: Sculpture as Place, 1958-2010 is made possible by lead support from the Henry Luce Foundation and the Terra Foundation for American Art. Additional tour support is provided by the Fundación Almine y Bernard Ruiz-Picasso para el Arte; The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston; the National Endowment for the Arts; and Sotheby’s.

The Los Angeles presentation is organized by Bennett Simpson, Senior Curator, with Anna Katz, Wendy Stark Curatorial Fellow, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

MOCA’s Lead support is provided by the Aileen Getty Foundation, and the Lenore S. and Bernard A. Greenberg Fund.

Generous support is provided by The Mohn Family Foundation.

Additional support is provided by Wonmi and Kihong Kwon, and Joseph Varet and Esther Kim Varet.

Exhibitions at MOCA are supported by the MOCA Fund for Exhibitions with lead annual support provided by Delta Air Lines, Shari Glazer, and Sydney Holland, founder of the Sydney D. Holland Foundation. Generous funding is also provided by Allison and Larry Berg, and Jerri and Dr. Steven Nagelberg.

Image credit: Installation view, Carl Andre: Sculpture as Place, 1958–2010, Dia:Beacon, Riggio Galleries, Beacon, New York, © Carl Andre/Licensed by VAGA, New York, photo by Bill Jacobson Studio, New York, courtesy Dia Art Foundation, New York

RELATED PROGRAMS

MEMBERS’ OPENING: CARL ANDRE: SCULPTURE AS PLACE, 1958–2010
Saturday, April 1
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
INFO 213/621-1794 or membership@moca.org
FREE for MOCA members; no reservations necessary

LECTURE: CHARLES BERNSTEIN
Sunday, April 30, 3pm
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE with museum admission; priority entry for MOCA members

LECTURE: BENNETT SIMPSON
Thursday, May 4, 7pm
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE

LECTURE: ANNA CHAVE
Thursday, July 6, 7pm
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE

Please check moca.org for updates on related programs.

Carl Andre
ARTHUR JAFA: LOVE IS THE MESSAGE, THE MESSAGE IS DEATH
April 2–June 12, 2017
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
Curator: Helen Molesworth

Love Is The Message, The Message Is Death is a new video by artist, director, and award-winning cinematographer Arthur Jafa. Set to the searing highs and lows of Kanye West’s gospel-inspired hip-hop track “Ultralight Beam,” Love Is The Message is a masterful convergence of found footage tracing African American identity through a spectrum of contemporary imagery that includes photographs of civil-rights leaders watermarked “Getty Images,” helicopter views of the L.A. Riots, and a wave of bodies dancing the Dougie. The meticulously edited seven-minute video suspends viewers in a swelling, emotional montage that is a testament to Jafa’s profound ability to mine, scrutinize, and reclaim media’s representational modes and strategies. Alongside images of familiar Black icons and historic events are also scenes of lesser-known figures, anonymous bodies in various states of elation and despair. Excerpts from Jafa’s own documentary film Dreams Are Colder Than Death (2014) add a personal dimension to a work otherwise drawn from news media, television, and the Internet. While Love Is The Message poignantly embodies the artist’s desire to create a cinema that “replicates the power, beauty and alienation of Black Music,” it also reminds us that the collective multitude defining Blackness comprises singular individuals with manifold identities and unaccountable differences.

Arthur Jafa: Love Is The Message, The Message Is Death is organized by Helen Molesworth, Chief Curator, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

Exhibitions at MOCA are supported by the MOCA Fund for Exhibitions with lead annual support provided by Delta Air Lines, Shari Glazer, and Sydney Holland, founder of the Sydney D. Holland Foundation. Generous funding is also provided by Allison and Larry Berg.

Image credit: Arthur Jafa, Love Is The Message, The Message Is Death (still), 2016, single-channel video (color, sound), 7:30 minutes, courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York/Rome

RELATED PROGRAMS

ARTHUR JAFA AND HELEN MOLESWORTH IN CONVERSATION
Sunday, April 2, 1pm
Tateuchi Democracy Forum at the National Center for the Preservation of Democracy (NCPD)
111 North Central Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90012
INFO 213/621-1741 or visitorservices@moca.org
FREE with museum admission; priority entry for MOCA members

LOS ANGELES FILMFORUM AT MOCA PRESENTS
ARTHUR JAFA’S DREAMS ARE COLDER THAN DEATH
Thursday, May 11, 7pm
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
INFO 213/621-1745 or education@moca.org
FREE for MOCA and Los Angeles Filmforum members
$15 general admission, $8 students with valid ID

Please check moca.org for updates on related programs.

Soft Work
SELECTIONS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION: CATHERINE OPIE AND STERLING RUBY
April 2–June 12, 2017
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
Curator: Bennett Simpson

MOCA presents two recent acquisitions to the museum’s permanent collection: SOFT WORK (2011–13) by Sterling Ruby and Inauguration Portfolio (2009) by Catherine Opie. Shown in the United States for the first time, Ruby’s SOFT WORK is a large-scale installation of stuffed fabric sculptures in unsettling biomorphic forms. Appendaged cushions and gaping, fang-filled mouths are manically arranged as sausage link–like drips from the ceiling, coiled heaps across the floor, and slumping, abject forms throughout the space. Using textiles that evoke the colors and motifs of the American flag, the sprawling installation offers up that iconic symbol of national pride as an intensely visceral experience—a political scene filled with performative “bodies” that seem to manifest both theater and playground simultaneously. Opie’s 33-photograph Inauguration Portfolio, a collective portrait of the over one million Americans who gathered on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., to partake in the inauguration of President Barack Obama, provides a compelling documentary counterpoint to SOFT WORK. Opie focuses her lens not on the swearing-in ceremony itself or other such singular historical moments but instead on more elusive or anti-climactic subject matter—the anonymous figures bundled up in 20-degree weather, the Jumbotron screen broadcasting the ceremony, and the detritus left behind after the crowd has dispersed. Opie’s poignant photographs suggest that the election is significant not only for the person at its center but for the millions of Americans whom the commander-in-chief is called upon to represent through the democratic process.

Selections from the Permanent Collection: Catherine Opie and Sterling Ruby is organized by Bennett Simpson, Senior Curator, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

Image credit: Sterling Ruby, installation view of SOFT WORK (2011-13), Art Basel: Unlimited, Switzerland, 2014, photography by Timo Ohler, courtesy of Sprüth Magers

 

Comment?

Name
Email
Comment Title
Rating
Comment Content

 

 

loading...