Cultural Events In Los Angeles
Aug 072017
 
MOCA Exhibitions Fall 2017

Anna Maria Maiolino, Por um Fio (By a Thread), from the Fotopoemação (Photopoemaction) series, 1976, archival inkjet print, 22 3/8 x 31 1/8 in. (57 x 79 cm.), photo by Regina Vater

MOCA’S LA/LA EXHIBITION SCHEDULE

ANNA MARIA MAIOLINO
August 4–December 31, 2017
MOCA Grand Avenue

ADRIÁN VILLAR ROJAS: THE THEATER OF DISAPPEARANCE
October 22, 2017–February 26, 2018
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

AXIS MUNDO: QUEER NETWORKS IN CHICANO L.A.
September 9–December 31, 2017
MOCA Pacific Design Center and the ONE Gallery

ANNA MARIA MAIOLINO
August 4–December 31, 2017
MOCA Grand Avenue
Curators: Bryan Barcena and Helen Molesworth

As part of Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), presents Anna Maria Maiolino, the first comprehensive U.S. museum survey of work by artist Anna Maria Maiolino. The exhibition considers five decades of her varied artistic practice including printmaking, drawing, sculpture, photography, video, and performance. From her early woodcut works and performances, which spoke directly to the tense political atmosphere during Brazil’s military dictatorship, to introspective paper works that express the feelings of alienation and marginalization that arose from her status as an immigrant, Maiolino’s work is uniquely capable of tracing the course of the movements that define Brazilian art history. She channels these through a personal, psychologically charged practice that charts her own introspective path as migrant, mother, and artist. Although she has been the subject of various exhibitions in Europe, Maiolino is only now beginning to be recognized in North America for her accomplishments. Her work is ripe to be explored within new contexts, given that it parallels, and in some cases presages, larger dialogues and processes that defined artistic developments during each period of her five-decade long career. This exhibition will cover the full range of Maiolino’s oeuvre from the early 1960s through the present with an equal focus on its socio-historical dimensions—particularly the issues of migration, linguistic competence, feminism, dictatorship—and the ever-present dialectical tension between art and life, between the timeless and the everyday, between what can be said and what is felt.

 

MOCA Exhibitions Fall 2017
ADRIÁN VILLAR ROJAS: THE THEATER OF DISAPPEARANCE
October 22, 2017–February 26, 2018
The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
Curators: Bryan Barcena and Helen Molesworth

The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), presents Adrián Villar Rojas: The Theater of Disappearance, a site-specific installation inside The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA’s warehouse space. Villar Rojas (b. 1980, Rosario, Argentina) has built a singular practice by creating environments and objects that seem to be in search of their place in time. Villar Rojas’s interventions beckon viewers to consider fragments that exist in a slippery space between the future, the past, and an alternate reality in the present. With his post-human artworks, Villar Rojas posits the question: What happens after the end of art?

For his project at MOCA, Villar Rojas will radically transform the Little Tokyo space, employing dramatic architectural and aesthetic shifts. In preparation for the installation, Villar Rojas spent a great deal of time exploring technologies used in Hollywood special effects and was struck by the universal digitization of the industry. From his perspective, it echoes a kind of post-human world dominated by technology, and in response, he will create an environment in The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA that is at once tactile and ephemeral, otherworldly and utterly human. Villar Rojas will use remaining materials and surviving bits of “art” from projects produced across the globe and recycle them into new “art,” this time tailor-made for The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA. Petrified wood from Turin, stratified columns from Sharjah, and silicone molds from Istanbul will not be reinstalled as what they once were but instead will have a second, unpredictable life. These elements will journey from “art” to “non-art” and back again to “art,” reinforcing their impermanence and our own in relation to our attempts to ascribe imperishable meanings and values to the world around us.

Image credit: Adrián Villar Rojas, The Theater of Disappearance, 2017, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, photo courtesy of the artist, Marian Goodman Gallery, New York / Paris / London, and kurimanzutto, Mexico City, photo by Jörg Baumann

MOCA Exhibitions Fall 2017
AXIS MUNDO: QUEER NETWORKS IN CHICANO L.A.
September 9–December 31, 2017
MOCA Pacific Design Center and the ONE Gallery
Curators: David Evans Frantz, Curator at the ONE Archives at the USC Libraries, and C. Ondine Chavoya, Professor of Art and Latina/o Studies at Williams College, in collaboration with The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), is pleased to host Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A., organized by ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives at the USC Libraries as part of Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA. The exhibition will be shown in two West Hollywood spaces, MOCA Pacific Design Center and the ONE Gallery. It will feature more than 50 LGBTQ and Chicano artists who created experimental artworks in a variety of media between the 1960s and early 1990s—a period bookended by the Chicano Moratorium, gay liberation, and feminist movements on one end, and the ravages of the AIDS crisis on the other. Axis Mundo is the result of extensive research by co-curators David Evans Frantz, Curator at the ONE Archives at the USC Libraries, and C. Ondine Chavoya, Professor of Art and Latina/o Studies at Williams College. While developing the exhibition, the curators visited archives at institutions throughout North America and the United Kingdom and met with artists—as well as family members, friends, and collaborators of those artists—whose work has not been exhibited publicly since the 1970s or 1980s.

Image credit: Teddy Sandoval, Las Locas, c. 1980, acrylic and mixed media on unstretched canvas, 39 x 52 in. (99 x 133.4 cm), collection of Paul Polubinskas, photograph by Fredrik Nilsen

 

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